“Individual commitment to a group effort – that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.” – Vince Lombardi

Companies invest in all sorts of functions, programs and initiatives under the auspice of sales force enablement. But, without a solid foundation to support them, many of these investments achieve less than expected results. In our third post on the three pillars of sales enablement, we look at the impact of cross-functional collaboration on sales enablement.

If you missed our previous posts on the Three Pillars of a Sales Force Enablement Foundation, you can find them here:

Pillar #1: Alignment to the Customer’s Journey

Pillar #2: The Enablement Charter

Pillar #3: Getting cross-functional collaboration right to achieve enablement goals

Cross-functional collaboration does not exist for its own sake. The purpose of collaboration is to achieve better results, ideally in a shorter amount of time. Sales force enablement is always a cross-functional discipline because no enablement team can provide integrated content, training and coaching services throughout the entire customer’s journey for different user groups and powered by technology without contributions from other departments and functions.

Through collaboration, sales enablement can provide enablement services faster and of greater value, is in a better position to achieve enablement’s goals in terms of sales results and productivity and can keep enablement as cost-efficient as possible.

The data from our CSO Insights 2016 Sales Enablement Optimization Study shows that cross-functional collaboration has an important impact on enablement success. With ad hoc collaboration, only 36 percent could achieve all or most of their enablement goals. With formal collaboration approaches, 59 percent could achieve all or most of their enablement goals.

As with our first two sales force enablement pillars, many organizations have ample room for improvement. At a combined 68.8 percent, informal and ad hoc collaboration are still the leading approaches, but this is an improvement from last year’s 83 percent. While the percentages appear to be moving in the right direction, 43 percent of all study participants still collaborate on an informal basis, and almost 10 percent don’t collaborate at all.

For more on cross-functional collaboration, refer to:

Collaboration In Enablement: Current State, Improvements and Challenges

Collaboration Requires Community, Coaching and Culture

How To Leverage Cross-Functional Collaboration Models

Collaboration Requires Community, Coaching and Culture

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